Sushi Wagocoro @ Helsinki – “Setsubun” Special

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Yesterday’s lunch.

Before having coffee at good old Finnish cafe yesterday, we had delicious sushi lunch at the best sushi restaurant in Helsinki (most likely the best in Finland 🙂 ), Wagocoro. About the restaurant, check it out my old post,  “Genuine Sushi at Wagocoro @ Helsinki“. They serve genuine Japanese sushi prepared by a genuine Japanese sushi master. You never get disappointed 🙂

昨日のランチはヘルシンキで一番(おそらくフィンランドで一番!)おいしいお寿司屋さん、Wagocoro でいただいた。このお店については以前書いているので詳細は”Genuine Sushi at Wagocoro @ Helsinki“ で。本物の寿司職人が握る正真正銘日本のお寿司。そしてまさに和心なおもてなし。いつ行ってもおいしくうれしい気分にしてくれるお寿司屋さんなのだ。

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I loved the small plate for soy sauce 🙂

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Wagocoro is closed on weekends but this Sunday, it will be exceptionally open for “setsubun”. It serves special sushi “ehomaki” for setsubun in addition to ordinary menu. (as to “setsubun”, read it at the bottom)

このお店、普段は土日が休みで残念なのだが、今週日曜日(2月3日)は節分の特別営業。12時から18時までオープンする。目玉は恵方巻。おいしいお寿司屋さんの恵方巻。さっそく予約してしまった 🙂

Setsubun(節分) is the day before the beginning of Spring in Japan. The name literally means “seasonal division”, but usually the term refers to the Spring Setsubun, properly called Risshun (立春) celebrated yearly on February 3 as part of the Spring Festival (春祭 haru matsuri). In its association with the Lunar New Year, Spring Setsubun can be and was previously thought of as a sort of New Year’s Eve, and so was accompanied by a special ritual to cleanse away all the evil of the former year and drive away disease-bringing evil spirits for the year to come. This special ritual is called mamemaki (豆撒) (literally “bean throwing”). Setsubun has its origins intsuina (追儺), a Chinese custom introduced to Japan in the eighth century. –wikipedia